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Hearing Resource Library

Another resource to provide you with access to many helpful hearing related articles.

What is an Audiologist?

Audiologists are health-care professionals who evaluate, diagnose, treat, and manage hearing loss, tinnitus, and balance disorders. An Audiologist is a person who holds a minimum of a Masters degree in Audiology.

How do I know if I have Hearing Loss?

Hearing loss is a natural part of the aging process. Hearing challenges can begin to present themselves based upon your hearing health history, including exposure to loud noise, certain medications, infections, head or ear trauma, congenital (birth or prenatal) or hereditary factors, as well as a number of other causes.

Hearing Aids in the Presence of Background Noise

Virtually all patients wearing hearing aids complain about background noise at one time or another. There is no way to completely eliminate background noise.

What is Digital Technology?

The term digital is used so often today, it can be confusing. When a hearing aid is termed digital, it generally means the hearing aid uses 100% digital processing. In other words, the hearing aid is indeed a complete computer.

Types of Hearing Aids

There are many styles of hearing aids. The degree of the hearing loss, power and options required, manual dexterity abilities, cost factors, and cosmetic concerns are some of the factors that will determine the style the patient will use.

Three Levels of Hearing Aid Technology

There are essentially three levels of hearing aid technology. We refer to these as analog, digitally programmable, and digital.

Type and Degree of Hearing Loss

Results of the audiometric evaluation are plotted on a chart called an audiogram. Loudness is plotted from top to bottom. Frequency, from low to high, is plotted from left to right.

Hearing Aids: Reasonable Expectations for the Consumer

Since you are considering the purchase of hearing aids, it’s important for you to establish reasonable expectations from these highly sophisticated, miniature devices.

Do I Need Two Hearing Aids?

Basically, if you have two ears with hearing loss that could benefit from hearing aids, you need two hearing aids. It is important to realize there are no “normal” animals born with only one ear. Simply stated, you have two ears because you need two ears.

Realistic Expectations for the Hearing Aid User

Hearing aids work very well when fit and adjusted appropriately. They are designed to make words and the conversations easier to understand in all situations, without making sounds appear to be too loud.

Taking an Impression of the Ear

All custom made hearing aids and earmolds are made from a “cast” of the ear. The cast is referred to as an ear impression. The hearing aid specialist makes the ear impression in the office. It takes about 10 to 15 minutes.

Hearing Aid Battery Information

All batteries are toxic and dangerous if swallowed. Keep all batteries (and hearing aids) away from children and pets. If anyone swallows a battery it is a medical emergency and the individual needs to see a physician immediately.

Assistive Listening Devices (ALDs)

ALDs can increase the loudness of desired sounds, such as a radio, television, or a public speaker, without increasing the loudness of the background noises.

Types of ALDs

There are many assistive listening devices available today, from sophisticated systems used in theaters and auditoriums to small personal systems.

Medical Science Shows Insight into Noisy Eyeballs and Tinnitus

Tinnitus is an abnormal perception of a sound which is reported by patients that is unrelated to an external source of stimulation. Tinnitus is a very common disorder.

Cause of Tinnitus

Tinnitus may originate from various lesions and from different sites. The auditory system involves highly complicated inner ear structures, many afferent and efferent nerve pathways and a great amount of nuclei that form a complex meshwork.

The American Tinnitus Association: A Resource for Enhancing Tinnitus Patient Services

The American Tinnitus Association (ATA) assists healthcare providers in serving patients who have, or are learning to cope with, tinnitus.

There IS something you can do about tinnitus!

Nearly 50 million people in the U.S.A. have tinnitus. Tinnitus may be described as a ringing, hissing or other noise heard in the ears or head